Originating in China, Japan or Korea, Crape Myrtle Scale (first identified in 2004) is sweeping through the US.

A New Exotic Pest

2. Small white/grey scale on bark

Can it kill my crape myrtle?

​Most of the time, by itself, crape myrtle scale will not kill the plant but it can take it's immune system down so that if something else comes along (another pest, disease, or fungus) it could easily (and quickly) take the tree down.


How do I get rid of it?
WHAT HASN'T BEEN SHOWN TO WORK:
​Horticultural oil. 
Foliar insecticide sprays (spraying the leaves)



WHAT HELPS:
Wash the trunk and reachable limbs with a soft brush and mild solution of dishwashing soap and water. 
- Although, we do not recommend using dishwashing soap on plants during     
   the summer. Because of the heat, it can damage the plant.-

WHAT WORKS BEST:
​ Systemic insecticides (follow the instructions on the insecticide).
Specifically, products that contain either clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid or thiomethoxam, have shown the most promise in tests to date!



IT HAS TO BE A SYSTEMIC. 
Systemic products work like a flu shot. 
​They are poured at the base and go up into the tree

through the roots. 
Because they have to work their way up into the tree, 
DO NOT EXPECT INSTANT RESULTS. 
It can take up to 30 days to fully be taken up into the tree. 

Also, spraying the foliage with a systemic product doesn't do any good. 
​All it will do is waste the insecticide.



The systemic product is available in our store!
Tell any of our associates you need something to kill Crape Myrtle Scale

and they can point you in the right direction!

Wanting to research crape myrtle scale a bit more? 
Check out A&M's AgriLife Extension's research on this new pest: 

Symptoms:

1.Black "soot" on bark & leavesof crape myrtle and possibly surrounding plants. This is normally the first thing that is noticed. It's actually a mold but is caused by the excretions the bug makes. Get rid of the bug and the mold will slowly go away on it's own.